The Meadow

Emily Dickinson wrote that all it takes to make a prairie is “one clover, and a bee. / And revery.” It turns out that to know a prairie (or meadow) is a bit more complicated, as photographer Barbara Bosworth and writer Margot Anne Kelley have discovered. For more than a decade, Bosworth and Kelley have meandered in, studied and photographed a single meadow in Carlisle, Massachusetts. In addition to their own investigations, they have invited botanists, entomologists, naturalists and historians to consider the meadow with them. Also included are historic maps of the property dating to the 1800s, and a transcription of notes from a former owner whose family has continuously documented plant and bird life in the meadow from 1931 until the 1960s.

Part photo-essay, part journal and part scientific study, this book is a meditation on the shifting perspective that occurs when one repeatedly sees the same place through new eyes.

Available from Radius Books

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Nominated for the Paris Photo - Aperture Foundation PhotoBook of the Year, 2016

"This beautifully produced book, which examines a small plot of meadow, is a real gem. From misty autumnal landscapes to spring flowers, all seasons are celebrated. These images are supplemented with a fine text, assorted inventories and thorough appendixes of things like what birds were spotted with their dates. It is very reassuring that one small plot can be so lovingly explored and it is the thoroughness of this that makes this book so compelling."

- Martin Parr
TIME Best Photobooks 2016

 

 

Natural Histories

Over the last 20 years, renowned Boston artist Barbara Bosworth (born 1953) has taken photographs of her family in and around her childhood home in Novelty, Ohio. Natural Histories takes us on a meandering journey through the forests and streams of Bosworth’s past in the Chagrin River Valley, as she retraces her youthful walks to reengage the sense of wonder at the landscape instilled by her father. She remembers, “Our explorations were slow and quiet meanders, as my father proclaimed the joys of looking at the natural world we passed through. On these walks I learned to love being in nature.”

These lush black-and-white photographs made with an 8 x 10 camera reveal a place Bosworth knows well: a place in which to dig up arrowheads, pluck clusters of blackberries, catch fireflies and savor the textures of nature. Featuring the youngest as well as the oldest members of Bosworth’s family, these images explore the joy of youth and the wistfulness of aging, memory, and the passage of time.

Available from Radius Books

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Trees: National Champions

Trees capture our imagination because they are rooted solidly in the earth but point ethereally toward the sky. They occupy a dimension that has as much to do with time and patience as with place and landscape. They are vertical beings to whom we attribute qualities both divine and human. Since 1991, photographer Barbara Bosworth has been on a quest to photograph America's "champion" trees—trees that are the biggest of their species, as recorded in the National Register of Big Trees, a list established and maintained by the nonprofit conservation organization American Forests. She has traveled down highways and up back roads, walked through forests and across clear-cut land, sometimes led by local tree enthusiasts, sometimes alone, to photograph trees that are remarkable not only for their size but for their endurance.

Bosworth finds champion trees in backyards, fields, and forests, near roadways, power lines, and sidewalks. Her photographs document the trees' magnificence but also show how they are markers of a changing landscape. The yellow poplar, for example, stands on the fringes of a suburban housing development, in the center of a park for the enjoyment and relaxation of residents. The western red cedar stands alone in the middle of a clear-cut, saved from logging only because it is recorded in the Register as the biggest of its kind. The trees and their surroundings tell us about our relationship with nature and the land.

Bosworth captures the ineffable grace and dignity of trees with clarity and directness: the green ash that shades a midwestern crossroads, the common pear that blooms in a Washington field, and the Florida strangler fig with its mass of entwining aerial roots. Her photographs, panoramic views taken with an 8 x 10 camera, show the immensity of the largest species and the hidden triumphs of the smallest. Some trees are dethroned each year because of sickness or destruction, but more often simply because a new and bigger specimen is discovered; only three trees from the original Register in 1940 are still living today. Bosworth's 70 photographs of champion trees are not only a collection of tree portraits but the story of an American adventure as well.

A co-publication with the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, Tucson.

Available from MIT Press

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Behold

First edition, 300 signed and numbered copies

"When my mother was suffering from Parkinson’s disease and a bit of dementia, she would often reach out 

her hands into the air. As if she was trying to catch something from heaven. A few years ago, when my father 

was dying, our family gathered around his bedside. When my mother reached for something in the air, I asked 

her what she was reaching out for and she replied, “Oh, the birds!”

I knew then, my bird photographs were for my mother and father. About holding on and letting go. About the moment the bird flies away."

Hard Cover / Accordion Binding
130 x 185 mm
82 pages
Printed in Korea
Bound by Datz Books, Seoul, Korea
Datz Books has an independent  production system
for publishing. The entire bookmaking process is
carried out with exquisite craftsmanship.
Book ⓒ 2014 by Datz Press
Photographs ⓒ 2014 by Barbara Bosworth
Published by Datz Press, Seoul, Korea

Available from Datz Press

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Betula Populifolia

Betula Populifolia is a handmade book with letterpress printing. All images are inkjet prints on translucent paper, interleaved with Arches paper. Each book in the edition of 50 includes a pressed Grey Birch leaf. Letterpress by John Kristensen, Firefly Press, Boston, Massachusetts. Prints by Alex Knudsen, and binding by Emily Sheffer.

Book and Photographs © Barbara Bosworth 2015

Numbered and signed 

For purchase inquiries please email bbosworth0@gmail.com

Book Video

Selected Images

 

 

 

Summer Days and Some Nights: The Water's Edge

Summer Days and Some Nights: The Water’s Edge is a book of photographs by Barbara Bosworth. The images were made in Maine during the summer of 2014 for the Georges River Land Trust. Each book in the edition of 100 includes a sand sample from the Saint George River in Maine. Designed by Alex Knudsen, and printed by Meridian Printing.

Book and Photographs © Barbara Bosworth 2015

Numbered and signed

For purchase inquiries please email bbosworth0@gmail.com

Book Video

Selected Images